Difference between secured and unsecured credit cards

There are two primary types of credit cards — secured and unsecured. Secured credit cards are backed by a cash deposit, generally equal to the card’s limit. This acts as collateral and removes the risk of nonpayment for the card issuer. Secured credit cards are great options for those who haven’t built a solid credit history yet.

Secured cards aren’t the same as prepaid cards. With a secured card, your cash deposit doesn’t run out as you spend, as it does with a prepaid card. You’ll make payments the same way as you would with an unsecured card, and you’ll pay interest if you don’t pay off your balance in full. Once you transition to an unsecured card or cancel your secured card, you’ll receive your deposit back, provided you’ve paid off the balance.

Unsecured credit cards aren’t backed by a cash deposit or any other collateral. You’ll get a credit limit based on your income level and credit history, so most likely your first card’s limit will be low.

Issuers take on more risk when they approve unsecured cards. Because of this, those without credit history generally need to start with a secured card, or get an unsecured card with a cosigner. Alternatively, you can ask to be added to a relative or friend’s credit account as an authorized user. As an authorized user, you’ll be able to use a credit card and will likely benefit from the primary cardholder’s good credit habits, but you won’t be legally obligated to pay the balance.

Source: https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/11-credit-card/#emv